Fellow at the London School of Economics

Sandra Obradovic

I am a social and political psychologist interested in understanding how psychosocial dynamics of identity, power and history shape intergroup relations in domestic and international contexts.

Sandra Obradovic

About me

I am currently a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics (LSE) in the UK and an Associate Researcher at the Electoral Psychology Observatory (LSE). 

My interest in social psychology, as a lens through which to view the world and its socio-political wonders, emerged while I was completing my BSc. in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). One particular semester I was enrolled in a introductory course to Social Psychology, while simultaneously working as a Research Assistant for the UCLA Middle & High School Diversity Project, a joint longitudinal study between UCLA’s Department of Education and Department of Psychology. This semester, I was introduced to the work of Goffman and Mead in my lectures, and engaged in data collection and literature reviews aimed at understanding the psychosocial benefits of racial/ethnic diversity in schools as part of my RA job. These experiences combined led to a growing interest in understanding the intersection of how we think, feel and see the world, and the role of relevant others, societies, cultures and institutions in shaping these processes. Shortly after graduating from UCLA in 2013, I jumped the pond to the UK to begin an MSc in Social and Cultural Psychology at the LSE. During my MSc, my research interests crystallized into a curious focus on understanding phenomena that sit at the intersection between history, psychology and politics. In particular, my MSc dissertation, which received the Hilde Himmelweit Award (2014) focused on exploring intergenerational differences in collective memory of war in a post-conflict context, discussing the implications of the silencing of criticism and diverging perspectives on the past.

To some extent it was from this project that my PhD thesis developed. My doctoral work applied theories of identity and group dynamics to examine the role of history, power and national identity in the process of supranational integration. More precisely, my work explored the tensions between historical continuity and political change in Serbia, as prospective EU member-state. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative methods, the thesis illustrated the importance of a multi-level understanding of political change, as both a process understood and experienced through the everyday lives of citizens, and as situated in a larger, international context where national politics become shaped and constrained by larger international power-relations.

 

My current research projects can be divided into three, interlinking strands; 1) research on how different conceptualizations of national identity shape political attitudes and behaviours, 2) research on recognition and its implications for intergroup dynamics and selfhood, and 3) research on perceived collective continuity and its strategic mobilization in the promotion of, or resistance towards, change.

 

When I’m not trying to juggle the many responsibilities of an academic career I spend a lot of time trying to juggle the many responsibilities of being a social human, including travelling to visit family, spending time with friends in London and spending countless hours on the hunt for the best coffee in the city.

Education

London School of Economics

2018

PhD in Psychology

Committee: Caroline Howarth (adviser), Ilka Gleibs & Steve Reicher.
Dissertation: Continuity in times of change: the role of power, history and national identity in the context of supranational integration.

London School of Economics

2014

MSc in Social & Cultural Psychology

University of California, Los Angeles

2013

BSc (Hons) in Sociology

Publications

  • All
  • Peer Reviewed Journal Articles
  • Peer-Reviewed Book Chapters
  • Other Publications
Publication pressures create knowledge silos

Publication pressures create knowledge silos

Understanding the psychological appeal of populism

Understanding the psychological appeal of populism

Power, identity, and belonging: a mixed-methods study of the processes shaping perceptions of EU integration in a prospective member state

Power, identity, and belonging: a mixed-methods study of the processes shaping perceptions of EU integration in a prospective member state

Everyday Reconciliation

Everyday Reconciliation

Don’t forget to remember: collective memory of the Yugoslav Wars in present-day Serbia

Don’t forget to remember: collective memory of the Yugoslav Wars in present-day Serbia

Whose memory and why: A commentary on power and the construction of memory

Whose memory and why: A commentary on power and the construction of memory

Who are we and where are we Going: from Past Myths to Present Politics

Who are we and where are we Going: from Past Myths to Present Politics

Uses of the Past: History as a Resource for the Present

Uses of the Past: History as a Resource for the Present

Imagining collective futures: Perspectives from social, cultural and political psychology

Imagining collective futures: Perspectives from social, cultural and political psychology

The power of politics: How political leaders in Serbia discursively manage identity continuity and political change to shape the future of the nation

The power of politics: How political leaders in Serbia discursively manage identity continuity and political change to shape the future of the nation

Ideology and Actualized Democracy: Allies or Enemies?

Ideology and Actualized Democracy: Allies or Enemies?

Grants & Awards

European Association of Social Psychology

2020

Collaborative Research Grant

PI on project "Recognition of Belonging? Testing and expanding the Ingroup Projection Model" alongside Amena Amer (Greenwich, UK), Reşit Kışlıoğlu (Middle East Technical University - Northern Cyprus Campus) & Mihaela Boza (Al I Cuza University, Romania)

London School of Economics

2019

Research Grant

London, UK

London School of Economics

2019

Excellence in Education Award

London, UK

The BPS conference

2018

LSE Postgraduate Travel Award

Nottingham, UK

The ISTP conference

2017

LSE Postgraduate Travel Award

Tokyo, Japan

LSE Teaching Award

2017

Highly Recommended Class Teacher

London School of Economics, UK

The Niels Bohr Lectures in Cultural Psychology

2016

ECRP Political Psychology Travel Grant

Aalborg, Denmark

The Niels Bohr Lectures in Cultural Psychology

2016

Invited Speaker Travel Grant

Aalborg, Denmark

The ISPP Summer School and Conference

2016

Research Training Support Grant

Warsaw, Poland

LSE Teaching Award

2016

LSE Teaching Award

London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

COST IS1205 Summer School

2015

COST Trainee Grant

Split, Croatia

London School of Economics and Political Science

2014

Doctoral Studentship

London, UK

Hilde T. Himmelweit Prize

2014

Highest MSc Grade

London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

Teaching

Political Psychology
September 3, 2018
0
Human communication
September 3, 2018
0
Qualitative Methods
August 21, 2015
0
Social Psychology
August 21, 2015
0